Dr Prosper Bazaanah

Dr Prosper Bazaanah

Ghana

Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR-Water Research Institute)

Surface Water and Climate Change Division

Email me

Work and Research

Water, good health and sanitation are basic needs and universal human rights that needs to be accessed by all. Yet too often, access to water and sanitation are geographically, economically, and socially determined. The human rights, governance and participatory dimension gets lost, especially in remote rural areas. My study focuses on community-based participatory governance and sustainability of drinking water and sanitation systems in the Savannah Region, Ghana.

Fields Of Expertise

Water and environmental governance, local governance, community development, Political economy, Rural development

A QUEST FOR WATER SUSTAINABILITY

Water, good health, and sanitation are basic needs and universal human rights that need to be accessed by all. Yet too often, access to water and sanitation are geographically, economically, and socially determined. The human rights, governance and participatory dimension gets lost, especially in remote rural areas.

 

Through his passion and research, Dr Bazaanah developed and applied a model which examined improved technologies for the water and environment sector in Ghana. He has compared the performance of rope and handpump water systems in arid and water-scarce rural communities.

Using the Technology Acceptance model he developed, he looked at the feasibility, relative performance, and acceptance of both kinds of pumps for groundwater supply in the face of increased drought in the communities studied. In similar studies, he used the bottom-up model to examine the role of NGOs in the management of water and sanitation delivery in the face of increasing scarcity of water and access to basic sanitation in poor rural settings, drawing cases from rural communities in the Savelugu district of Northern Region, Ghana.

 

Inclusive and integrated management is of crucial importance to ensure sustainable local development in the district. For his FAR-LeaF project, Dr Bazaanah will be focusing on Community participation in governance and sustainability of rural water and sanitation systems in the Savannah Region, Ghana. Surveys of formal water officials and rural household consumers most of whom access to water and basic sanitation remains a wishful dream are part of this project.

 

Water supplies need to be hygienic, safe, and sustainable. Though water is an essential public good and a life-supporting resource, access to water and sanitation remains a challenge to rural dwellers.

 

It is perceived that access to water and sanitation service is likely to increase where there is good water governance and stakeholder participation in decision-making on local scales. From the standpoint of political ecology, Dr Bazaanah argues in this study that, the scarcity of water and environmental constraints created through human-environmental relations call for rethinking community participation, planning and good governance of water and the sanitation sector. 

 

Using the mixed research method, his study draws on 420 rural water users and water officials to analyse the community-based participatory governance systems and the driving factors affecting the sustainability of drinking water and sanitation systems in developing countries like Ghana.

 A new conceptual approach will be developed and proposed as an appropriate framework for the effective governance of environmental resources in rural communities.